Pedro Martinez: ‘Probably 60 Percent’ of MLB Players used PEDs

Former Boston Red Sox pitcher Pedro Martinez speaks Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, at Fenway Park, in Boston, after being elected to baseball's Hall of Fame. Martinez, a three-time Cy Young winner, helped the Red Sox to their first World Series title in 86 years in 2004. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
Former Boston Red Sox pitcher Pedro Martinez speaks Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, at Fenway Park, in Boston, after being elected to baseball’s Hall of Fame. Martinez, a three-time Cy Young winner, helped the Red Sox to their first World Series title in 86 years in 2004. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Former Boston Red Sox great has been vocal on his disapproval of steroid and performance enhancing drug usage during his time in MLB. In recent comments, Martinez notes that PED users — most notably his former Boston teammate Manny Ramirez —  were numerous in baseball:

“It wasn’t just Manny,” Martinez said of the use of performance-enhancing drugs. “Probably 60 percent of baseball was doing that.”

Martinez, who has stated he was clean, enjoyed pitching during the high times of the steroid era.

“I wouldn’t want it any other way,” Martinez said. “There’s no crying.”

Baseball purists probably cringe at statements from players like this, but does this signify a change in baseball? Probably, many players will always want to get the advantage and if players like Martinez, presumably clean, can dominate, maybe baseball should look into better PED reform.

No matter what you think, PED usage probably will not stop, and certainly cannot be fully controlled. Baseball has been slow to change its ways and the PED issue is concerning, but probably will not go away, probably not at all. The road to reforms is upon us. We will see how baseball adapts to the times.

ZMP

Do Americans care about Soccer? 

The American sporting landscape is changing. Football, even though still highly popular, has come under fire for being to violent and to detrimental to players’ health. Baseball has been declining in popularity amongst young kids, most likely for being too slow. Basketball has maintained its popularity, but has not surpassed football. The question comes when I ll Americans start caring about soccer and the MLS , Major League Soccer, the American league of global football.

Frank Deford of NPR notes that American interest in the global game has peaked, but Americans cannot seem to watch MLS:

For just about every other nation, soccer is thesport—a far, far better thing than the American dollar, beer, Google or sex. Alas, in the United States, soccer has been more commonly identified with soccer moms than soccer players.

The American sports fan loves sports. A fan will watch almost anything — hello PBA bowling. As Deford mentions, the World Cup does get great ratings every four years. However, Americans are used to the best professional sports leagues in the world. This means more Americans are going to watch European leagues over MLS.

MLS has a chance to grow and has been steadily increasing in popularity. At 20 years old the leaugue has expanded, even adding teams in Canada. MLS success relies on keeping home grown talent and growing the game in schools. Maybe ones at MLS will be compared to La Liga, but if that day comes it will not be for a long time.

ZMP

White Man Tells Former St. Louis Cardinal to ‘Go back to Ferguson’ 

curt ford
Curt Ford watches his sixth inning hit, Thursday, Oct. 23, 1987 in St. Louis, against the Minnesota Twins. The Cards won a 4-2 victory to go one game up in the World Series. Ford’s hit scored two runs and he collected an extra base on a throw. (AP Photo/Rob Kozloff)

Former St. Louis Cardinal Curt Ford was allegedly punched and told to ‘Go back to Ferguson’ by a white man at a gas station. Ford, an African American, is considering leaving St. Louis after the incident.

“I’ve had enough of St. Louis,” Ford, 54, told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “You hear about this kind of stuff happening, and I always knew it existed because of my previous experience working here in St. Louis, but you try to keep away from it and there is just no way you can do that unless you stay inside like a hermit.”

Racial tensions have been high in Missouri since the controversial death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri in August. Curt Ford’s case shows the continued lack of respect  blacks in this country get. An athlete who represented the area to the best of his ability should not be subjected to physical or verbal abuse because of the color of his skin. Nobody should be subjected to racial discrimination in any form.

The racial tensions in this country at this time are just an example of what we need to do to move forward. As a people, we need to move forward.

ZMP